$2 MILLION AVAILABLE SURF CLUB FACILITIES PROGAM

lOCAL MEMBER FOR cOFFS hARBOUR

Member for Coffs Harbour, Andrew Fraser, today encouraged surf clubs to apply to the NSW Government’s Surf Club Facilities Program which opened today to help fund upgrade and maintenance of surf club facilities.

Mr Fraser said the program aims to maintain the safety of surf life saver volunteers as they serve the community.

“The Surf Club Facilities Program provides funding for facilities in the Coffs Harbour electorate and across NSW,” Mr Fraser said.

“We all know how important surf life savers are to beach side communities both through protecting us when we swim and providing opportunities for a diverse range of people to give back through volunteering.”

“Our local surf life savers also benefit through maintaining health and fitness while enjoying our beautiful beaches.”

Types of projects that will be funded include:

· construction of new surf club facilities;
· capital enhancement of the facilities at existing clubs; and
· providing ancillary and support facilities at existing venues.

Applications open on 21 December 2016 and close 10 February 2017.

For more information or to apply visit www.sportandrecreation.nsw.gov.au/grants or phone 13 13 02.

FUNDING OPEN FOR LOCAL ABORIGINAL ARTS PROJECTS

Local aboriginal artists and arts organisations are now invited to apply for NSW Government funding to support local projects.

Member for Coffs Harbour, Andrew Fraser, said the NSW Aboriginal Regional Arts Fund is for projects in remote and regional NSW that encourage Aboriginal people to explore and express their cultural identities.

“I encourage all Aboriginal artists and arts organisations to apply for this funding which will allow them to share their stories and skills with their communities,” Mr Fraser said.

“This is well targeted support to build the skills, capacity and professional development of Aboriginal artists and arts organisations as well as create a diversity of stories and contemporary artworks which speak to local communities.”

The NSW Aboriginal Regional Arts Fund offers up to $5,000 for individual professional artists and up to $20,000 for organisations.

Minister for the Arts Troy Grant said the NSW Government is proud to support a vibrant, distinctive and contemporary Aboriginal arts and culture across NSW.

“Last year the fund supported 15 striking projects including painting, carving and fibre workshops in Western Riverina and Wollongbar, a collaboration with the Slim Dusty Museum, music, performances and artwork in Bathurst, Deniliquin and Walgett and documenting community stories in Wilcannia,” Mr Grant said.

The Fund supports projects that:
· enable Aboriginal communities in regional NSW to explore and express their cultural identities;
· engage and promote regional Aboriginal artists, arts and culture in NSW;
· encourage people to engage with Aboriginal arts and cultures;
· build the capacity and sustainability of Aboriginal arts organisations in regional NSW;
· increase skills development opportunities for Aboriginal artists in regional NSW.

Applications close on 27 February 2017. For more information: www.arts.nsw.gov.au

FUNDING FOR COMMUNITY PROJECTS TO COMBAT LOCAL CRIME

The Coffs Harbour electorate is being encouraged to come forward to the NSW Government with solutions to stamp down on local crime and anti-social behaviour.

Member for Coffs Harbour, Andrew Fraser, urged community groups, council, businesses and organisations to apply for a grant up to $250,000 for ideas to boost local safety and pride.

“The Community Safety Fund will invest in projects that address local crime hot spots and promotes safe and inclusive use of public space,” Mr Fraser said.
The Coffs Harbour electorate is being encouraged to come forward to the NSW Government with solutions to stamp down on local crime and anti-social behaviour.

Member for Coffs Harbour, Andrew Fraser, urged community groups, council, businesses and organisations to apply for a grant up to $250,000 for ideas to boost local safety and pride.

“The Community Safety Fund will invest in projects that address local crime hot spots and promotes safe and inclusive use of public space,” Mr Fraser said.

“I know many people in our community have innovative ideas of how to make our community a safer place and I encourage them to take up this funding opportunity. The NSW Liberals & Nationals Government is committed to reducing crime and making our state a safer place to live.”

Minister for Justice and Police Troy Grant said crime is a social and financial burden that the NSW Government is committed to reducing.

“We know there is always more that can be done to stamp out crime in our towns and suburbs and are working with the community to identify opportunities,” Mr Grant said.

“The reasons and consequences of crime in one region of NSW can be very different to other regions therefore it is important to invest in local solutions.”

Attorney General Gabrielle Upton said the $10 million program over four years has already helped make local crime reduction ideas a reality.

“The NSW Government is proud to partner with the community to prevent crime and address the fear of crime. This program has funded in community initiatives right across the state to enhance the work of Government and law enforcement agencies to combat crime,” Ms Upton said.

The Community Safety Fund aims to reduce crime and anti-social behaviour through infrastructure and service delivery projects that address local crime hot spots, anti-social behaviour and promotes safe and inclusive use of public space and collaborative approaches to crime prevention and detection.

Further information including application information: http://www.crimeprevention.nsw.gov.au/

Documentary film-maker says after a week in Australia he is surprised by how invisible the Indigenous population is

Presenter, Broadcaster and filmmaker Louis Theroux.
says he would like to make a film about Australian Indigenous culture.
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After just a week in Australia, documentary film-maker Louis Theroux is surprised at how invisible the Indigenous community is.

“I’ve been struck by how I’ve been here for nearly a week now and I feel I’ve clapped eyes on maybe one or two Indigenous people,” the British journalist told Guardian Australia from Melbourne where he is appearing in his first national speaking tour, Louis Theroux Live.

“But the condition of the Indigenous people of Australia is massively fascinating. I’d like to see how they are living; the experience of racial mixing or conflict such as it is and where it is taking place.”

The lives of Indigenous people and the isolation of the outback are two of the aspects of Australia Theroux may one day explore in film, in the same way that he has shone a light on the more curious aspects of American society.

“I’ve mentioned at a couple of shows that I’d like to do something on Indigenous culture and it gets applause,” the 46-year-old said. “It is on people’s minds; people are conscientious about it. But I also feel that it’s kind of out of sight. I am not visibly confronted with it.”

Louis Theroux webchat – your questions answered on Jimmy Savile, Islam and Scientology
The TV documentarist answered your questions, from his regrets about not exposing Jimmy Savile to vomiting and falling asleep during interviews. Catch up with his answers here
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Theroux, who has appeared in Perth and Melbourne, with Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide to follow, is amazed at how Anglo-Saxon Australia still is, in comparison with the multicultural face of his homeland.

“As far as the sort of the genetic stock that I am coming in contact with, it feels like it has 90% sprung from the UK and Ireland and it’s very, very striking,” Theroux said.

“Big time! In west London where I live, white people are a minority. In the area I am in, which is the borough of Brent, whites are less than 50%. So I am used to being just one of a number of shades of people so it feels quite different over here.”

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Theroux is yet to turn his attention to Australia in the dozens of documentaries he has made in the past 20 years but he has an abiding interest in the outback. Local documentary filmmaker Dennis O’Rourke is a favourite: in particular his work Cannibal Tours (1988) and Cunnamulla (2000).

“I am always drawn to things that feel different to what I would experience at home; things that offer a combination of unfamiliarity and a sort of bleak glamour. I think the outback has that.

“I’ve seen things about the opal mines of Coober Pedy.

“Cunnamulla is a beautifully bleak portrait of a lonely town in which people are leading lives of sort of quiet desperation. I would love to make a film in the outback or in Papua New Guinea, in Port Moresby. I know that it’s not in Australia, but it’s not too far.

Theroux says his familiar bumbling style is just how he is and that he is an anxious person by nature.

“I think I went in to be as nice and as adaptable as I could be in order to assure the person and get them to like me and get them to open up,” he says. “It was only really later I realised it was a powerful way to open up. The instinct was more humanistic than professional, but it turns out paradoxically to be a great way of getting to the story.”

Drinking To Oblivion: Louis Theroux’s sobering new documentary
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Theroux has moved away from the paedophiles, porn stars, hardened criminals and religious extremists in his earlier work, towards people afflicted with a medical condition or families facing huge challenges such as autism, dementia or a transgender child.

He says films about the latter are more difficult to make because they don’t immediately appeal to an audience who love to watch those “crazy guys in that cult” or others on the fringe of society.

His most recent films to be screened in Australia on Foxtel, A Different Brain and Drinking to Oblivion, are about people with brain injuries and people addicted to alcohol. They are “slightly more nuanced and arguably sadder”, he says.

“I find the medical films equally fascinating but I can see that they are not always as natural a draw for the audience … I never want to bore the audience. I don’t want them to think, ‘this is a worthy subject, I should watch it’.

“I just want them to sit down and enjoy it and be challenged and engaged and stimulated

Theroux agrees that his films, no matter the subject, try to show that everyone is human, and encourage us to see ourselves in everyone.

“I just try to open it up in a human way to show how the challenges take so much out of the people involved in it, both people struggling directly with the condition and the families of those people. It’s the most human thing imaginable.”

Louis Theroux’s new documentaries can be seen from 4 October at 8.30pm (AEDT) on BBC Knowledge on Foxtel

We haven’t learnt anything from the rise of Trump and Brexit

John Hewson SMH

German philosopher Georg Hegel once remarked: “Rulers, statesmen, nations are wont to be emphatically commended to the teaching which experience offers in history. But what experience and history teach is this – that people and governments never have learned anything from history, or acted on principles deduced from it.”

The key question for 2017 is just how much have the “elites” learnt from recent experience? How have they actually responded to Brexit, Trump, Hanson, and so on.

Russia undoubtedly meddled in election
National Intelligence Director James Clapper said Russia poses a major and growing threat to US government, military, diplomatic and commercial operations. Senators suggested the President-elect should take notice.

The obvious answer, so far, is that the “elites” have simply not learnt anything: they have not responded substantially, rather attempting to close ranks against the “outsider”, treating such events as but a mere aberration to their social agenda, soon to return to their “normal”. This will not, and cannot, be a sustainable response.

Trump is already demonstrating that, like it or not, things will be different. Just look at the response to his threats to US car manufacturers – threatening a hefty tax on GM for the importation of cars built in Mexico, and how Ford, all of a sudden, decided that their planned new plant would now be built in the US rather than in Mexico.

Fake news is a real thing, and it is not what Donald Trump says it is
Markets ‘disappointed’: Trump speech sends $A soaring
Also, think about the likely consequences of some of his foreshadowed cabinet and other appointments. For example, focus on the substance of his “trade team” of Ross, Navarro and Lighthizer, all aggressive and anti-China.

Basically, Trump ran on an “anti-establishment” agenda. He will, and must, deliver against the key elements of this agenda. As such, he will simply not just go away, and the “elites” can’t afford to just turn their backs on his reality.

However, despite the significance of the challenge in recent years, there has been very little progress or reform, as the “elites” have closed ranks and moved on.

Think about the global responses to say the Asian crisis of the late ’90s, and the GFC more recently, where so many called for a fundamental reform of the “global financial architecture”, but, in the end, producing almost no genuine reform.

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Illustration: Andrew Dyson
Illustration: Andrew Dyson
In the very early days, we are already seeing the US Congress starting to close down or restrict the Trump agenda. The Trump administration/congressional fight has just begun.

I recall, appallingly, a Liberal fundraising dinner some years ago, where a high-paying guest asked a simple direct question, outlining myriad economic/social issues confronting the state government, seeking an explanation as to the government’s committed policy response, only to be told “we will muddle through, as we have always done”. End of dinner! Why should we bother!

I am disturbed at how the policy intelligentsia and the media elite are already closing ranks, as if this is just an aberration, we can, and will, handle it. Yet, they were caught short predicting that a Trump just “couldn’t happen”, and ever since have been attempting to rationalise their inadequacies.

Of course, many recall, and indeed take great heart from, the failures of Jimmy Carter and his “assault on the Washington establishment”, in the guise of the world’s greatest micro-manager.

Yes, nothing short of a disaster! But Trump is no Carter. Closing congressional ranks may not matter, as he appeals over the top directly to his electoral constituency.

The reality is that Trump will attack “‘trade”, he will restrict immigration, he will shoot from the hip on many issues.

The difficulty with Trump is that he believes, indeed he has “promised”, that he can run the US government as he has run his various businesses.

Not much of an argument is it, when he has limped over many disasters, and racked up enormous debts in the process.

Even worse if you dare to focus on the detail on just how Trump will handle the “conflicts of interest” issues or with conflicts with the Emoluments Clause in the constitution, let alone the recent reports that over $US1 billion ($1.34 billion) of Trump Organisation debt has been “securitised” and sold to some 150 institutions around the world. Apparently, much of that debt is underwritten by Trump personally. What would happen to Trump and the presidency if things went wrong?

Moreover, success in business is definitely not transferable to success in politics. In business, you have a degree of control that doesn’t translate to politics, no matter how powerful you believe yourself to be!

Actually, there are no good old days to which we may aspire to duplicate, or to return to. If Trump proves to be the disaster most expect, he will nevertheless change things.

What we need is a government to think and strategise (say) several decades ahead, recognising the “new reality”, and give us some hope that we can achieve it.

John Hewson is a professor at the Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU, and a former Liberal opposition leader.

Breaking News from ABC Coffs Coast News

NSW Government may release its vision for development of the COFFS HARBOUR WATERFRONT IN 2017

Discussion is underway with several NSW Government departments to create one tenure for all public land at the Coffs Harbour waterfront.
There has been uncertainty for some time about the plans fro the Jetty precinct including public – private developments and commercial leases.

Coffs Harbour MP Andrew Fraser said he hopes the new plan for the harbour front can be drawn up in 2017.

He said previous blueprints for the important area have failed to attract community support.

” What’s happened in the past has been development of the Jetty has been an imposition on our community by Government.” Mr Fraser said.

What we hope to do in 2017 is to have community discussions, workshops , maybe some draft plans so people can comment

My attitude has always been you must take the people with you.

“In the past what’s been proposed has been overdevelopment, and people haven’t liked it.”

Mr Fraser said the current discussions include several government departments including Premiers and Cabinet and Primary Industries.

‘THAT’S HAPPENING At the moment and I would hope sometime in the new year we will have a opportunity to have a plan drawn up for the future of the Jetty,” he said.

” Not something that’s been put before but something that I hope would be exciting and meets with public approval.”

“Imagine: Part of Coffs Harbour waterfront earmarked for re-development.

Trump Received Unsubstantiated Report That Russia Had Damaging Information About Him

Trump Received Unsubstantiated Report That Russia Had Damaging Information About Him

On Tuesday night, Mr. Trump responded on Twitter: “FAKE NEWS – A TOTAL POLITICAL WITCH HUNT!”

In an appearance recorded for NBC’s “Late Night With Seth Meyers,” Mr. Trump’s spokeswoman, Kellyanne Conway, said of the claims in the opposition research memos, “He has said he is not aware of that.”

Since the intelligence agencies’ report on Friday that President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia had ordered the hacking and leaks of Democratic emails in order to hurt his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, and help Mr. Trump, the president-elect and his aides have said that Democrats are trying to mar his election victory.

The decision of top intelligence officials to give the president, the president-elect and the so-called Gang of Eight — Republican and Democratic leaders of Congress and the intelligence committees — what they know to be unverified, defamatory material was extremely unusual.

The appendix summarized opposition research memos prepared mainly by a retired British intelligence operative for a Washington political and corporate research firm. The firm was paid for its work first by Mr. Trump’s Republican rivals and later by supporters of Mrs. Clinton. The Times has checked on a number of the details included in the memos but has been unable to substantiate them.

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The memos suggest that for many years, the Russian government of Mr. Putin has looked for ways to influence Mr. Trump, who has traveled repeatedly to Moscow to investigate real estate deals or to oversee the Miss Universe competition, which he owned for several years. Mr. Trump never completed any major deals in Russia, though he discussed them for years.

The former British intelligence officer who gathered the material about Mr. Trump is considered a competent and reliable operative with extensive experience in Russia, American officials said. But he passed on what he heard from Russian informants and others, and what they told him has not yet been vetted by American intelligence.

The memos describe sex videos involving prostitutes with Mr. Trump in a 2013 visit to a Moscow hotel. The videos were supposedly prepared as “kompromat,” or compromising material, with the possible goal of blackmailing Mr. Trump in the future.

The memos also suggest that Russian officials proposed various lucrative deals, essentially as disguised bribes in order to win influence over Mr. Trump.

The memos describe several purported meetings during the 2016 presidential campaign between Trump representatives and Russian officials to discuss matters of mutual interest, including the Russian hacking of the Democratic National Committee and Mrs. Clinton’s campaign chairman, John D. Podesta.

If some of the unproven claims in the memos are merely titillating, others would amount to extremely serious, potentially treasonous acts.

One of the opposition research memos quotes an unidentified Russian source as claiming that the hacking and leaking of Democratic emails was carried out “with the full knowledge and support of TRUMP and senior members of his campaign team.” In return, the memo said, “the TRUMP team had agreed to sideline Russian intervention in Ukraine as a campaign issue” because Mr. Putin “needed to cauterize the subject.”

Michael Cohen, a lawyer and adviser to Mr. Trump, also went to Twitter to deny a specific claim in the opposition research involving him. One of the memos claims that Mr. Cohen went to Prague in August or September to meet with Kremlin representatives and to talk about Russian hacking of Democrats.

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Mr. Cohen tweeted on Tuesday night: “I have never been to Prague in my life. #fakenews.”

In addition, in a recent interview with The Times, one of the Russian officials named in the memo as having met with Mr. Cohen, Oleg Solodukhin, denied that he had met with Mr. Cohen or any other Trump representative.

“I don’t know where that rumor came from,” Mr. Solodukhin, of the Russian organization Rossotrudnichestvo, which promotes Russian culture and interests abroad, said in a telephone interview.

The Times reported before the election that the F.B.I. was looking into possible evidence of links between the Trump campaign and Russia. But the investigation surfaced again at a Senate hearing on Tuesday in a series of questions from Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, to the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey.

Mr. Wyden, trying to draw Mr. Comey out on information he may have heard during a classified briefing, asked if the F.B.I. had investigated the Trump campaign’s contacts with Russia. Mr. Comey demurred, saying he could not discuss any investigations that might or might not be underway. Mr. Wyden kept pressing, asking Mr. Comey to provide a written answer to the question before Mr. Trump’s inauguration on Jan. 20 because he feared there would be no declassification of the information once Mr. Trump took office.

After the hearing, Mr. Wyden posted on Twitter: “Director Comey refused to answer my question about whether the FBI has investigated Trump campaign contacts with Russia.”

The F.B.I. obtained the material long before the election, and some of the memos in the opposition research dossier are dated as early as June. But agents have struggled to confirm it, according to federal officials familiar with the investigation.

Allies of Senator Harry Reid, the Senate Democratic leader from Nevada who retired at the end of the year, said the disclosures validated his call last summer for an investigation by the F.B.I. into Mr. Trump’s links to Russia.

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Democrats on Tuesday night pressed for a thorough investigation of the claims in the memos. Representative Eric Swalwell of California, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, called for law enforcement to find out whether the Russian government had had any contact with Mr. Trump or his campaign.

“The president-elect has spoken a number of times, including after being presented with this evidence, in flattering ways about Russia and its dictator,” Mr. Swalwell said. “Considering the evidence of Russia hacking our democracy to his benefit, the president-elect would do a service to his presidency and our country by releasing his personal and business income taxes, as well as information on any global financial holdings.”

David E. Sanger and Carl Hulse contributed reporting.

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A version of this article appears in print on January 11, 2017, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump Was Told of Claims Russia Has Damaging Details on Him. Order Reprints| Today’s Paper|Subscribe

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Trump Report That Russia Had Damaging Information About Him

Trump Received Unsubstantiated Report That Russia Had Damaging Information About Him

WASHINGTON — The chiefs of America’s intelligence agencies last week presented President Obama and President-elect Donald J. Trump with a summary of unsubstantiated reports that Russia had collected compromising and salacious personal information about Mr. Trump, two officials with knowledge of the briefing said.

The summary is based on memos generated by political operatives seeking to derail Mr. Trump’s candidacy. Details of the reports began circulating in the fall and were widely known among journalists and politicians in Washington.

The two-page summary, first reported by CNN, was presented as an appendix to the intelligence agencies’ report on Russian hacking efforts during the election, the officials said. The material was not corroborated, and The New York Times has not been able to confirm the claims. But intelligence agencies considered it so potentially explosive that they decided Mr. Obama, Mr. Trump and congressional leaders needed to be told about it and informed that the agencies were actively investigating it.

Intelligence officials were concerned that the information would leak before they informed Mr. Trump of its existence, said the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak about it publicly.
On Tuesday night, Mr. Trump responded on Twitter: “FAKE NEWS – A TOTAL POLITICAL WITCH HUNT!”

In an appearance recorded for NBC’s “Late Night With Seth Meyers,” Mr. Trump’s spokeswoman, Kellyanne Conway, said of the claims in the opposition research memos, “He has said he is not aware of that.”

Since the intelligence agencies’ report on Friday that President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia had ordered the hacking and leaks of Democratic emails in order to hurt his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, and help Mr. Trump, the president-elect and his aides have said that Democrats are trying to mar his election victory.

The decision of top intelligence officials to give the president, the president-elect and the so-called Gang of Eight — Republican and Democratic leaders of Congress and the intelligence committees — what they know to be unverified, defamatory material was extremely unusual.

The appendix summarized opposition research memos prepared mainly by a retired British intelligence operative for a Washington political and corporate research firm. The firm was paid for its work first by Mr. Trump’s Republican rivals and later by supporters of Mrs. Clinton. The Times has checked on a number of the details included in the memos but has been unable to substantiate them.

Got a confidential news tip?
The New York Times would like to hear from readers who want to share messages and materials with our journalists.

Learn More
The memos suggest that for many years, the Russian government of Mr. Putin has looked for ways to influence Mr. Trump, who has traveled repeatedly to Moscow to investigate real estate deals or to oversee the Miss Universe competition, which he owned for several years. Mr. Trump never completed any major deals in Russia, though he discussed them for years.

The former British intelligence officer who gathered the material about Mr. Trump is considered a competent and reliable operative with extensive experience in Russia, American officials said. But he passed on what he heard from Russian informants and others, and what they told him has not yet been vetted by American intelligence.

The memos describe sex videos involving prostitutes with Mr. Trump in a 2013 visit to a Moscow hotel. The videos were supposedly prepared as “kompromat,” or compromising material, with the possible goal of blackmailing Mr. Trump in the future.

The memos also suggest that Russian officials proposed various lucrative deals, essentially as disguised bribes in order to win influence over Mr. Trump.

The memos describe several purported meetings during the 2016 presidential campaign between Trump representatives and Russian officials to discuss matters of mutual interest, including the Russian hacking of the Democratic National Committee and Mrs. Clinton’s campaign chairman, John D. Pedestal.

If some of the unproven claims in the memos are merely titillating, others would amount to extremely serious, potentially treasonous acts.

One of the opposition research memos quotes an unidentified Russian source as claiming that the hacking and leaking of Democratic emails was carried out “with the full knowledge and support of TRUMP and senior members of his campaign team.” In return, the memo said, “the TRUMP team had agreed to sideline Russian intervention in Ukraine as a campaign issue” because Mr. Putin “needed to cauterize the subject.”

Michael Cohen, a lawyer and adviser to Mr. Trump, also went to Twitter to deny a specific claim in the opposition research involving him. One of the memos claims that Mr. Cohen went to Prague in August or September to meet with Kremlin representatives and to talk about Russian hacking of Democrats.
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Mr. Cohen tweeted on Tuesday night: “I have never been to Prague in my life. #fakenews.”

In addition, in a recent interview with The Times, one of the Russian officials named in the memo as having met with Mr. Cohen, Oleg Solodukhin, denied that he had met with Mr. Cohen or any other Trump representative.

“I don’t know where that rumor came from,” Mr. Solodukhin, of the Russian organization Rossotrudnichestvo, which promotes Russian culture and interests abroad, said in a telephone interview.

The Times reported before the election that the F.B.I. was looking into possible evidence of links between the Trump campaign and Russia. But the investigation surfaced again at a Senate hearing on Tuesday in a series of questions from Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, to the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey.

Mr. Wyden, trying to draw Mr. Comey out on information he may have heard during a classified briefing, asked if the F.B.I. had investigated the Trump campaign’s contacts with Russia. Mr. Comey demurred, saying he could not discuss any investigations that might or might not be underway. Mr. Wyden kept pressing, asking Mr. Comey to provide a written answer to the question before Mr. Trump’s inauguration on Jan. 20 because he feared there would be no declassification of the information once Mr. Trump took office.

After the hearing, Mr. Wyden posted on Twitter: “Director Comey refused to answer my question about whether the FBI has investigated Trump campaign contacts with Russia.”

The F.B.I. obtained the material long before the election, and some of the memos in the opposition research dossier are dated as early as June. But agents have struggled to confirm it, according to federal officials familiar with the investigation.

Allies of Senator Harry Reid, the Senate Democratic leader from Nevada who retired at the end of the year, said the disclosures validated his call last summer for an investigation by the F.B.I. into Mr. Trump’s links to Russia.

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COMMENTS
Democrats on Tuesday night pressed for a thorough investigation of the claims in the memos. Representative Eric Swalwell of California, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, called for law enforcement to find out whether the Russian government had had any contact with Mr. Trump or his campaign.

“The president-elect has spoken a number of times, including after being presented with this evidence, in flattering ways about Russia and its dictator,” Mr. Swalwell said. “Considering the evidence of Russia hacking our democracy to his benefit, the president-elect would do a service to his presidency and our country by releasing his personal and business income taxes, as well as information on any global financial holdings.”

David E. Sanger and Carl Hulse contributed reporting.

Get politics and Washington news updates via Facebook, Twitter and in the Morning Briefing newsletter.

A version of this article appears in print on January 11, 2017, on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump Was Told of Claims Russia Has Damaging Details on Him. Order Reprints| Today’s Paper|Subscribe

Continue reading the main story
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“Details of the reports began circulating in the fall and were widely known among journalists and politicians in Washington.”How interesting…
G 12 minutes ago
Gives new meaning to the word ‘leaks’.
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Where are all the gun toting, flag waving, “Constitution loving Patriots” now?
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2016 SENIORS CHRISTMAS CONCERT DVD’S AVAILABLE

Member for Coffs Harbour, Andrew Fraser, would like to advise that he has a limited number of 2016 Seniors Christmas Concert DVD’s available in his Electorate office.

“Each year the NSW Government presents the Premier’s Gala Concerts in Sydney during NSW Seniors Week in March, and the Seniors Christmas Concerts, which tour to different regions of NSW,” Mr Fraser said.

“These concerts are in recognition and thanks to our state’s Seniors for their valued contribution to our communities over many year.

“This year’s concerts were presented in Bathurst, Lismore and Wollongong.

The theme was ‘Next Stop …. Christmas’ and features some incredibly talented performers.

“These wonderful concerts were warmly received by local audiences.

“The DVD is produced because the Government understands that not all of our seniors are able to attend live events.

“Copies of the DVD have also been distributed to palliative care facilities, nursing homes and aged care facilities across NSW and I have a limited number available in my Electorate Office for anyone who would like a copy,” Mr Fraser concluded.

9 January 2017